Bodyguard: How To Survive In 10 Easy Steps

Learn the value of a durable suitcase and a portable steamer. If you are on the road for any duration of time, the case is going to take a beating and what’s packed in it usually will never be “ready to wear”. Of course if your lucky, the nicer hotels may do your ironing for you at no charge.

Remember: Reporters are not your friends (most times). Say something and you might be (mis)quoted, so its best to point them to a publicist or someone else in the camp.  With that said, the worst person to be rude to is the media. You might not even get mentioned by name, but it could cast your client (and therefore potential future earnings) in a bad light.

For over the road travel try and purchase polo shirts in bulk.  While some guys do the “white Tee” look, I lean more towards the black polo tops. You can pretty much find them at Foot Lockers everywhere. Inexpensive, quick to throw on (and fits well over a bulletproof vest if necessary).

Be careful what you eat, especially in a foreign country.  Running back and fourth to an airplane lavatory is not fun. And let’s not even discuss tour bus facilities.

Always pack your own luggage! TSA security does not care who you work for. Also, for those of us who carry firearms, we also know the additional hassle of trying to check one in prior to boarding, so give yourself extra time.

Make sure you take advantage of all the frequent flier programs.   An insider secret is that while outside parties usually make the arrangements and pay for the bodyguards travel, in most cases the actual traveler gets the mileage credit.  A worldwide tour (provided your not flying private) could easily mean a few free roundtrip tickets when you finally do get some downtime.

Learn to tip (even if it’s with your own money).  It’s going to make your job smoother with the public. Be it a restaurant host, a hotel bellman or a club bouncer you need to pull in for some additional backup, tipping will make the process of having your VIP truly treated like one go a lot easier.

Avoid Groupies.  ‘Nuff said.

Find the hotel gym, not the hotel bar. In theory Close Protection Agents are on call, so you don’t want to be pounding a few down when something happens.

This is the most important one: Remember why you are there. Sure a tour means seeing new and exciting people, places and things, but the role of the Executive Protection Agent is to be the first line of defense in protecting your client from harm. Often in a tour setting you might find yourself playing several different positions just to make it all run smoother, but no one in our profession wants to be known as the person who was on the scene when something goes bad and couldn’t fix the problem. Or worse yet, was too distracted to notice.

via Bodyguard Blog » Blog Archive » Tour Security: How To Survive In 10 Easy Steps.

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